McKenna: Moratorium on offshore drilling now!

UPDATED: BP (British Petroleum), the same company responsible for the Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Horizon disaster that saw 4.9 million barrels of oil spilled, the death of 11 workers and devastating consequences for local fisheries, economies and communities, has begun exploratory drilling off the coast of Nova Scotia. Drilling began on the first of seven wells on April 22, 2018 – Earth Day – and BP spilled 136,000 litres of toxic drilling mud 61 days later. That well came up dry, and is now being abandoned. BP may drill six more exploratory wells offshore Nova Scotia. Read more »

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UPDATED: BP (British Petroleum), the same company responsible for the Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Horizon disaster that saw 4.9 million barrels of oil spilled, the death of 11 workers and devastating consequences for local fisheries, economies and communities, has begun exploratory drilling off the coast of Nova Scotia. Drilling began on the first of seven wells on April 22, 2018 – Earth Day – and BP spilled 136,000 litres of toxic drilling mud 61 days later. That well came up dry, and is now being abandoned. BP may drill six more exploratory wells offshore Nova Scotia.

Not only is new fossil fuel production the opposite direction we need to go in addressing climate change, it puts Nova Scotian waters, marine life and related good jobs at risk from a serious oil spill. Some of the wells BP plans to drill are at unprecedented depths, twice as deep as than those of the Deepwater Horizon disaster. Even if these wells don’t produce oil, offshore exploration work has serious impacts on the oceans and the people who depend on them.

Meanwhile, our government refuses to insist on requiring corporations like BP to cap an oil spill quickly. The U.S. requires oil companies to have blowout-capping equipment on site within 24 hours. BP will be allowed two weeks!

A letter from industry expert Dr. Robert Bea shows that the risk assessment approved by the Canadians Environmental Assessment Agency is “not valid” and that the risks of BP’s offshore drilling “have not been properly assessed, documented and validated.”  There are real risks of seismic testing in the offshore, and evidence is mounting to show that seismic blasts impact the health of all kinds of marine life – from plankton to whales.

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